Marie Curie – the Woman I Most Admire

Marie-CurieThe woman I most admire was shy and suffered from depression. However, she was so determined and so full of empathy for the human race that she spent three entire years of her life shovelling heavy dirt to find an elusive element that she thought might benefit human kind. Marie never faultered in the face of hard work; In fact, she drove herself sometimes to complete breakdown. She never faultered in the face of danger either, as she spent another four years of her life in proximity to bombs and bullets to rescue soldiers from loss of limbs and even lives. That woman was Marie Curie. She suffered the loss of a sister when she herself was seven, followed by the loss of her mother when she was eleven. The loss of her loving husband by a traumatic accident triggered profound depression, but she found the courage from within to continue with her life during which she founded atomic physics, promoted new ways to fight cancers, and personally took medical technology to the dangerous warfront of WWI to save soldiers from amputation and death. The fact that Marie Curie overcame personal woes and personal danger to help others speaks to her inner morality. Even Albert Einstein, who sometimes found her irritating in her lack of flexibility, admired her when he said, “I have always admired Marie Curie. Not only did she do outstanding work in her lifetime … and help humanity greatly … she invested all her work with the highest moral quality.” Marie was a stubborn woman who insisted on what was right in every detail. For example, she imposed her conviction that the American check for gift money raised for her Radium Institute be made out to the institute, and not inaccurately to her. She kept her promises, such as the promise to her husband by personally taking her radium to safety when the German’s invaded France in WWI. Intelligence, perseverance, integrity, and courage all combined in one feisty little woman. What a role model! Meg Read more about Marie Curie’s accomplishments in Lexi and Marie Curie Saving Lives in World War I.

Leave a reply